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Hop To It Sale code HOP14Butterfly Whimsy Stretch Bracelet5 Off 30 Orders Code APRIL5

Cotton handbag, 'Naturally Elegant'

Item # 46990
No longer available
Cotton lends its natural colors to a trendy bag by Luisa Villavicencio. "The bag is soft, comfortable and big. It adjusts to every woman's need ñ we usually keep so much stuff in our bags!" says the Guatemalan designer. "Combining cotton with suede leather makes the bag more elegant and versatile." Woven on a traditional pedal loom, the cotton originates from Villavicencio's farm and has not been dyed. Fully lined with cotton (not from the farm), the bag has two compartments divided by a middle pocket, as well as a lateral inner pocket. Shiny brass fixtures and braided cotton ropes complete the bag's stylish allure.
  • Features a magnetic button closure
  • Bag:
       14.0" H x 20.0" W x 4.3" D
    Handles:
       20.0" L x 1.0" W
    Strap drop length:
       9.0" from strap to handbag
  • Weight: 1.4 lb
  • 100% cotton trimmed with suede leather and brass fixtures. Cotton lining
  • Offered in partnership with NOVICA, in association with National Geographic.

Please allow 12 to 24 days for delivery. This item is not available for express shipping and cannot be delivered to PO Boxes or APO/FPO.

This item ships from a third party and may be excluded from certain promotions. Please see the Current Promotions page for details.

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Artisan: Luisa Villavicencio

Artisan Luisa Villavicencio 'My story is really the story of my whole family, beginning with my parents,' says Guatemala's Luisa Villavicencio. 'My father was passionate about growing cotton, a crop that originated with the Maya. We work with only three pure colors. Apart from the crude cotton color, we use a seed known as ixcaco that produces brown cotton. We call our third color jade. All the rest of our colors are a result of combining fibers and threads from these three when weaving the fabric.'

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