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Goal: 30,000 Progress: 916
Sponsored by: The Hunger Site

In 1976, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was put in charge of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act which governs the disposal of solid and hazardous waste in the United States. Over the years, this important piece of legislation has seen many changes. Now, it's time for a new amendment.

Organic material like food scraps are currently piling up in America's landfills, rotting and producing methane, a greenhouse gas 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide. According to the EPA, landfills are the third-largest source of methane in the U.S., behind industry and agriculture.

It doesn't have to be this way, though.

Across the country, cities have taken the initiative to implement mandatory composting and are experiencing environmental and economic benefits. Composting puts organic material to good use, as composing produces nutrient-rich fertilizer instead of generating methane. This can help stop or even reverse the fact that one-third of the world's arable land has been lost to soil erosion. A nation-wide system consisting of many small, local or regional operations would also help create sustainable, eco-friendly jobs across the country.

Composting isn't just a question of leaving table scraps separate for garbage collectors, however. Currently, the United States, 71% of composting facilities are dedicated only to yard trimmings, infrastructure inadequate and unprepared to handle food waste. Lack of funding has halted much of the progress made in the 1990s towards the creation or expansion of more composting facilities, and this has to change if a national composting program is to become a reality.

Clearly, composting is as civil leaders like New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg say, the "final recycling frontier." We need the leadership of the EPA to tackle the proper management of compostable organic material.

Call on the EPA to amend the 1976 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to include mandatory composting collection of food scraps and other compostable materials and to collaborate with state and local governments to address the severe lack of funding and composting facilities equipped to receive and process food waste.

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To the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency,

New York's Mayor, Michael Bloomberg, has called composting the city's "final recycling frontier." I am writing to ask that you use your position of power and authority to create a new program for composting food waste on a national scale.

To help sustain our planet, we simply cannot afford to continue throwing away our food scraps. As you are probably aware, as food rots in landfills, it creates dangerous methane gas, a greenhouse gas 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide. According to the EPA, landfills are the third-largest source of methane in the U.S., behind industry and agriculture.

Across the country, cities have taken the initiative to implement mandatory composting and are experiencing environmental and economic benefits. Composting puts organic material to good use, as composing produces nutrient-rich fertilizer instead of generating methane. This can help stop or even reverse the fact that one-third of the world's arable land has been lost to soil erosion. A nation-wide system consisting of many small, local or regional operations would also help create sustainable, eco-friendly jobs across the country.

Operations like these have proven large-scale composting operations can and do work.

Composting isn't just a question of leaving table scraps separate for garbage collectors, however. Currently, the United States, 71% of composting facilities are dedicated only to yard trimmings, infrastructure inadequate and unprepared to handle food waste. Lack of funding has halted much of the progress made in the 1990s towards the creation or expansion of more composting facilities, and this has to change if a national composting program is to become a reality.

Please, amend the 1976 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to include mandatory composting collection of food scraps and other compostable materials and collaborate with state and local governments to address the severe lack of funding and composting facilities equipped to receive and process food waste.

The United States needs the leadership and vision of the EPA to tackle the proper management of compostable organic material. It can be done. Indeed, for the health of our country and planet, it must be done.

Thank you,

Petition Signatures


Sep 23, 2017 Nicole Mikals
Sep 19, 2017 Rachel Howe
Sep 19, 2017 Upali Magedaragamage
Sep 14, 2017 deb romero
Sep 12, 2017 Melanie Chischilly
Sep 10, 2017 Luis Chelotti
Sep 9, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Sep 6, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Sep 5, 2017 Lens Lucas
Sep 5, 2017 Elena Knox
Sep 3, 2017 Lillian Kraemer
Aug 30, 2017 Carolina Nunes
Aug 29, 2017 Angelina Schiedel
Aug 25, 2017 Alanna Reuben
Aug 25, 2017 Shirley Patterson
Aug 23, 2017 Marsha Ross
Aug 16, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Aug 16, 2017 Gil Hackel
Aug 15, 2017 Rilla Heslin
Aug 13, 2017 Thomas Windberg
Aug 11, 2017 Brian Gottejman
Aug 9, 2017 Tracy Schalk
Aug 7, 2017 AniMae Chi
Aug 6, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Aug 4, 2017 Glenda Foreman
Aug 4, 2017 Debbie Meadows
Aug 3, 2017 debbie mason
Aug 2, 2017 Serenella Castri
Aug 1, 2017 Roseann Maziarek
Jul 27, 2017 Catheryn Sproull
Jul 24, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jul 22, 2017 Mr. Keith Horne
Jul 21, 2017 Fern Swecker
Jul 19, 2017 Sue Jackson
Jul 19, 2017 Cairn Mahoney
Jul 13, 2017 Carol Halberstadt
Jul 6, 2017 (Name not displayed) I think composting and recycling should BOTH be as common and accessible as regulated trash pick-up.
Jul 5, 2017 Kristi L. Meccia
Jul 4, 2017 Mark Berriman
Jul 2, 2017 Chris McWilliams
Jun 30, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jun 30, 2017 Eva Sandhammar
Jun 29, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jun 29, 2017 Susan Hanlon
Jun 27, 2017 Stefano Fuschetto
Jun 24, 2017 Miriam Feehily
Jun 23, 2017 David Crawford
Jun 22, 2017 Robert Sanders
Jun 16, 2017 Dorothy Henry
Jun 15, 2017 Adam Fransella

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