Skip navigation

no spam, unsubscribe anytime.
Skip navigation
Goal: 30,000 Progress: 5,903
Sponsored by: The Hunger Site

When it comes to feeding our families, there should be no second guessing whether commercially available food is safe or nutritious. For too long, the lax requirements dealing with food expiration dates have prompted confusing labeling at best, resulting in hundreds of thousands of tons in wasted food and hungry households.

Apart from baby formula, there is no federally mandated system in the United States to classify dates by which products must be sold by, are freshest by, and expire, and the differences between. Fewer than 25 states currently require dating labels at all, and where it is required, the date may refer to some characteristic other than food quality.

The USDA maintains that "use-by" and "sell-by" dates may not determine when a product needs to be thrown away, and that products may still be "safe, wholesome, and of good quality" after that period if handled properly. But such obscure details are lost on many, leading to at least 40 percent of all food in the US going to waste, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council.

The inefficiencies of this system are putting the nutritional needs of a significant and growing number of Americans at risk. In a 2015 report by Feeding America, it was found that 42.2 million Americans lived in food insecure households, including 29.1 million adults and 13.1 million children.

While staggering, these numbers cannot be reduced without an adequate and easily employed solution to determining quality and freshness. Such an option has been proposed by the private and nonprofit collaborative ReFED, formed in 2015 to draw up a "Roadmap to Reduce U.S. Food Waste."

ReFED's plan, standardizing date labeling throughout the country, could feasibly prevent 400,000 tons of food going to waste in its first year alone.

Other innovations in label design could provide solutions to the problem as well. In a Wired article from July 2016, a strip that changes color to indicate freshness over time was proposed, as were design alterations to ingredient details that simplify and emphasize important nutritional facts.

We need legislation at the federal level which creates a nationally recognized system for expiration dates, requiring labels indicate a food's peak freshness date as well as the date after which the food is unsafe to eat. The technology to do so is not only available, but easily implemented.

Sign below and tell the FDA's Office of Nutrition, Labeling, and Dietary Supplements that national standards for expiration dates need to be put in place now!

Sign Here






Dear Food and Drug Administration, Office of Nutrition, Labeling, and Dietary Supplements,

For far too long, the lax requirements dealing with food expiration dates have prompted confusing labeling at best, resulting in hundreds of thousands of tons in wasted food and hungry households.

When it comes to feeding our families, there should be no second guessing whether commercially available food is safe or nutritious.

Apart from baby formula, there is no federally mandated system in the United States to classify dates by which products must be sold by, are freshest by, and expire, and the differences between. Fewer than 25 states currently require dating labels at all, and where it is required, the date may refer to some characteristic other than food quality.

The USDA maintains that "use-by" and "sell-by" dates may not determine when a product needs to be thrown away, and that products may still be "safe, wholesome, and of good quality" after that period if handled properly. But such obscure details are lost on many, leading to at least 40 percent of all food in the US going to waste, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council.

The inefficiencies of this system are putting the nutritional needs of a significant and growing number of Americans at risk. In a 2015 report by Feeding America, 42.2 million Americans lived in food insecure households, including 29.1 million adults and 13.1 million children.

While staggering, these numbers cannot be reduced without an adequate and easily employed solution to determining quality and freshness. Such an option has been proposed by the private and nonprofit collaborative ReFED, formed in 2015 to draw up a "Roadmap to Reduce U.S. Food Waste."

ReFED's plan, standardizing date labeling throughout the country, could feasibly prevent 400,000 tons of food waste even year.

Other innovations in label design could provide solutions to the problem as well. In a Wired article from July 2016, a strip that changes color to indicate freshness over time was proposed, as were design alterations to ingredient details that simplify and emphasize important nutritional facts.

We as Americans deserve a better system, and the technology to do so is not only available, but easily implemented.

I demand legislation at the federal level to create nationally recognized guidelines for expiration dates, requiring labels indicate a food's peak freshness date as well as the date after which the food is unsafe to eat.

 

Sincerely,

Petition Signatures


Aug 15, 2018 Lori Simons
Aug 15, 2018 MaryEdna Salvi
Aug 15, 2018 (Name not displayed) It is imperative that consumers know exactly what is going into our bodies. Most importantly, parents need know for the good of their children. FDA you are the gatekeeper. It is your duty to require labeling to accurately reflect all ingredients in food.
Aug 15, 2018 lucy Groetsch
Aug 15, 2018 DONNA JOSAITIS We need to know what we are eating. Proper and honest food labeling is paramount to making good food choices.
Aug 15, 2018 Ulpu-Maria Sulonen
Aug 15, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Aug 14, 2018 Gib M
Aug 13, 2018 Regina Flores
Aug 13, 2018 mary mendez I agree
Aug 11, 2018 R. Schultz
Aug 11, 2018 Sue Britton
Aug 11, 2018 Martha Vail
Aug 10, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Aug 10, 2018 Eleni Panagiotidou
Aug 9, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Aug 9, 2018 Dina Capra
Aug 9, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Aug 8, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Aug 8, 2018 Julie Martin
Aug 8, 2018 Lauren Abrahamson
Aug 8, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Aug 7, 2018 Joyce Ramirez
Aug 7, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Aug 7, 2018 malgorzata szyszka
Aug 6, 2018 Julie Capps
Aug 6, 2018 Rita Zielinski
Aug 6, 2018 Katherine burt
Aug 6, 2018 Ana Costa
Aug 6, 2018 Sharon Carton
Aug 6, 2018 Lori Hynes
Aug 6, 2018 Rose Martin
Aug 6, 2018 Regina Vieyra
Aug 6, 2018 Janice Geller
Aug 5, 2018 Brian Kelly
Aug 5, 2018 Richard Van Aken The less we waste the better off we'll all be.
Aug 5, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Aug 5, 2018 Anna Buenaventura
Aug 5, 2018 Rodica Sandulescu
Aug 4, 2018 Linda Wilson
Aug 4, 2018 lynn noe
Aug 4, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Aug 4, 2018 Chelsea Rivera
Aug 4, 2018 Cheryl Thayer
Aug 4, 2018 rohana wolf
Aug 4, 2018 Laura Kennell
Aug 4, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Aug 4, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Aug 4, 2018 Rene Johnson
Aug 4, 2018 Ginnette Simmonds

back to top

Just Believe Dragonfly Lightweight Hoodie
Share this page and help fund more food: